The quiet things that made and unmade me

delladilly:

I’d like to be my old self again, but I’m still trying to find it.

been thinkin about tswift a lot lately like you do sometimes when all you care about is pop culture and princesses, & i think the objectively best moment of this song aside from that devastating hairflip earlier is her performance of the innocence line, which is the only time that she holds eye contact with the camera— the rest of the time she’s pretty actively avoiding engaging with the camera’s gaze

and her look back is so challenging, so aggressive, which is fascinating to me because like, taylor swift’s career is built largely on this deliberate construction of idyllic innocence— a willowy white girl with long blonde hair who writes about “fairy tale” romances and talks about desire but only sex when it’s other girls doing it.

and then you have in this song a description of “days and nights when you made me your own” and the camera circling tswift like a vulture. and she says that only at the very beginning of her relationship with [you/a man/the camera] did she remind you of innocence, and that’s an accusation. suddenly [you] are the one determining and fetishizing her innocence— keeping and smelling her things because they remind you of this concept that she used to embody— before [you/the man/the camera] owned her, and in that ownership devalued her. “innocence” is suddenly both something you put on her unfairly and something you deny her now, and she’s looking back at you furiously, ruthlessly, holding you accountable for the way you’ve been looking at her in her princess dress, which is also obviously part of the performance.

anyway, i don’t know, but she doesn’t smile for the audience or the camera at the end, and she did about eighteen hair throwing neck maneuvers and that was pretty exciting too.

The naked female body is treated so weirdly in society. It’s like people are constantly begging to see it, but once they do, someone’s a hoe.
Lena Horne (via theflowershop)

From this point on, she whispered, we will either find or lose our souls.

I will not have my role usurped! I wear the crown! And if there are mistakes they will be my mistakes, and no one else will make them.

Sir John Conroy: You’re too young! You’ve no experience. You’re like a china doll, walking over a precipice…
Princess Victoria: Well then I must smash!
When you begin to see that your enemy is suffering, that is the beginning of insight.

Thich Nhat Hanh  (via maksg)

I see your suffering and I understand it is a condition of your ignorance. My ignorance was to think I could make you see yours…

(via n9nlinear)

Scottish independence referendum 2014 explained - is Scotland a country? Sort of.
From The Guardian Animations

As Atonement-author Ian McEwan aptly put it: “The act of Union never extended to the imagination. There are many English, Scots, Welsh, and Irish poets and novelists. But there is no British novel, just as there is no British football. In the arts, there is nothing British.”

(“When we invade Iraq, it’s all about Britain. But when we get turned out of the world cup, it’s England.”) 

think-progress:


In 2013 natural disasters displaced some 22 million people, with more than four-fifths of those being in Asia, according to a new report. Using four decades of data, the study by the Norwegian Refugee Council found that floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, droughts, and other hazards now cause twice as many people to lose their homes as in the 1970s. Over the last decade an average of 27 million people have lost their homes to disaster each year, and in 2010 that number rose to 42 million. In an especially bad year of violent conflict, 2013 saw three times more people lose their homes to natural disaster than war; this ratio has been as high as ten times in the past.

FACT: Climate change is understood to worsen many weather-driven natural disasters.

think-progress:

In 2013 natural disasters displaced some 22 million people, with more than four-fifths of those being in Asia, according to a new report. Using four decades of data, the study by the Norwegian Refugee Council found that floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, droughts, and other hazards now cause twice as many people to lose their homes as in the 1970s. Over the last decade an average of 27 million people have lost their homes to disaster each year, and in 2010 that number rose to 42 million. In an especially bad year of violent conflict, 2013 saw three times more people lose their homes to natural disaster than war; this ratio has been as high as ten times in the past.

FACT: Climate change is understood to worsen many weather-driven natural disasters.